Iraq war authorizations – Iraq War News http://iraqwarnews.net/ Sat, 27 Nov 2021 07:10:08 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://iraqwarnews.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-120x120.png Iraq war authorizations – Iraq War News http://iraqwarnews.net/ 32 32 The Pentagon doesn’t care about civilian casualties https://iraqwarnews.net/the-pentagon-doesnt-care-about-civilian-casualties/ Fri, 26 Nov 2021 14:03:56 +0000 https://iraqwarnews.net/the-pentagon-doesnt-care-about-civilian-casualties/ In August 2019, thousands of refugees, prisoners and families of ISIS fighters gathered in an encampment in the border town of Baghuz, in eastern Syria, one of the last territories controlled by the so-called Islamic State. The United States, supported on the ground by an allied Kurdish and Arab militia, launched a massive air assault […]]]>

In August 2019, thousands of refugees, prisoners and families of ISIS fighters gathered in an encampment in the border town of Baghuz, in eastern Syria, one of the last territories controlled by the so-called Islamic State. The United States, supported on the ground by an allied Kurdish and Arab militia, launched a massive air assault on the enclave.

As The New York Times reported on November 13, 2021, an American attack aircraft dropped its payload on the civilian encampment. “As the smoke cleared,” the article notes, “a few people stumbled away in search of shelter. Then a jet stalking them dropped a 2,000 pound bomb, then another, killing most of the survivors. ”At least 70 civilians died.

The death toll has been minimized and reports have been delayed, cleaned up and filed.

A Pentagon lawyer has reported internally that this is a possible war crime, but, “at almost every step, the military took action that covered up the catastrophic strike,” according to the Times. The death toll has been minimized and reports have been delayed, cleaned up and filed.

US-led coalition forces razed the site of the bulldozer blast. The Defense Ministry’s independent inspector general’s office launched an investigation, but the report was effectively censored. An assessor at that office lost his job when he complained about the cover-up.

In response to a request earlier this month from Times, the US Central Command acknowledged the strikes for the first time and admitted that 80 people were killed. Nonetheless, he insisted that the airstrikes were justified and that “no formal war crime notification, criminal investigation or disciplinary action was warranted.”

The Baghuz massacre was one of the last of 35,000 airstrikes launched by the United States over a five-year period in Syria and Iraq that pointedly targeted ISIS. Under Pentagon rules, US forces could call for air strikes without checking for threats to civilians, as long as it was deemed necessary for self-defense.

What constitutes “self-defense” for the Pentagon, however, is not just when its forces are under fire. Lethal force clearance may also be granted if enemy troops are simply suspected of displaying “hostile intent,” which the Pentagon has defined so broadly in the case of US-backed ground operations in. Syria that they made up 80% of all US airstrikes. .

The New York Times The article also noted that the Pentagon has failed to follow up on numerous reports of civilian casualties and generally failed to complete investigations. In the rare cases where an investigation was ordered, it was subsequently canceled. An email shared with the Senate Armed Services Committee revealed that the only time an investigation was allowed to proceed was when there was “potential for high media attention, [or] worry over outcry from the community / local government, worry that sensitive images might come out. “

So far, the Democratic-led Senate Armed Services Committee has refused to open an investigation into the Baghuz attack or any other possible war crimes committed by US forces in the war against ISIS.


New technologies have made bombing much more precise than during WWII, the Korean War or the Vietnam War. During these wars, the United States regularly engaged in carpet bombing of large urban areas, at the cost of hundreds of thousands of civilians. However, since the launch of the “war on terror”, the two main political parties have gone to great lengths to justify the killing of civilians in the name of the fight against terrorism.

For example, Congress passed a series of resolutions defending Israel’s attacks on civilian areas in the Gaza Strip, the West Bank, and Lebanon, which attempted to exonerate the U.S.-backed Israeli armed forces for thousands of civilian casualties.

Often these resolutions have defended Israeli attacks on civilians by claiming that Arab militias are using “human shields”. This is despite the fact that, although the use of civilians against their will to deter attacks on an adversary’s troops or military equipment is considered a war crime, it does not authorize bombing any more than it does. criminal holding hostages does not give the police the right to shoot the mall.

When investigations by Human Rights Watch, Amnesty International, the United Nations Human Rights Council, the US Army War College and others failed to find a single documented case of civilian deaths caused by Hamas or Hezbollah using human shields while fighting Israeli forces, Congress decided to redefine it.

A 2009 resolution, drafted by Democratic House leader Nancy Pelosi and passed by an overwhelming bipartisan majority, broadened the definition of the use of human shields to include any member of a designated “terrorist group” within it. a civilian population. By this definition, a Hamas official living in a high-rise building in Gaza would make the entire structure a legitimate military target. In other words, when it is enough to be near a “terrorist” to qualify a civilian as a human shield, an entire city can become a free fire zone.

Years earlier, I had predicted that this type of defense against Israeli war crimes would likely be used as a justification for “massive US airstrikes on Mosul, Raqqa and other cities controlled by the Islamic State. , regardless of the civilian casualties ”.

And that’s what happened. There was virtually no expression of concern in Congress when, in 2017, the United States launched heavy attacks on Syrian and Iraqi cities held by ISIS (which really used civilians as human shields ).

An Amnesty International investigation found that 1,600 civilians died in the US-led bombing campaign in Raqqa, largely destroying the Syrian city. The accuracy of the report, which has been called “the most comprehensive investigation into civilian deaths in a modern conflict”, has not been disputed, but it has been largely ignored in the US mainstream media.

It shouldn’t be surprising that the Pentagon thought it might get away with the 2019 Baghuz massacre.

There was little more coverage from the US-led bombing of Mosul earlier that year, when US planes hit thousands of targets, turning much of this ancient city into rubble. and causing the death of at least 3,000 civilians. A 2019 Human Rights Watch investigation determined that approximately 7,000 civilians had been killed over the past five years in Iraq and Syria in airstrikes by the United States and its allies.


With virtually no backlash in Washington, DC, or mainstream media coverage, it shouldn’t be surprising that the Pentagon thought it could get away with the 2019 Baghuz massacre. There seems to be a feeling that, given the horror of ISIS, the killing of large numbers of civilians may be necessary to ensure their defeat, so it is important to keep such tragedies silent.

The problem, however, goes far beyond Daesh. Even when it comes to another extremist militia (and even if an American attack on civilians makes headlines), the U.S. government has little reason to worry. For example, after belatedly admitting that a drone missile attack in Kabul last August targeted a car driven by an Afghan aid worker, killing him and nine others, including seven children, the Pentagon insisted that ‘there had been no misconduct or negligence.

The implication is that there would therefore be no change in procedures or personnel, and that the Pentagon would take no action to prevent such tragedies from happening again.

And there appear to be few political costs. Not only have leading Republicans defended the killing of civilians in the name of combating terrorism, but many Democratic members of Congress who have defended the Israeli bombing of civilian targets in Gaza have been repeatedly endorsed as “bold progressives.” and “peace leaders,” sending the message that the killing of civilians in the name of “self-defense against terrorists” is not seen as a problem, even within the Democratic left.

Meanwhile, the Biden administration continues to provide weapons, training and maintenance to Saudi and Emirati forces that killed tens of thousands of civilians in airstrikes in Yemen. A bipartisan majority in Congress reiterated that the billions of dollars in taxpayer-funded military aid to Israel remain “unconditional” despite the hundreds of civilians killed in last spring’s bombing of overcrowded urban neighborhoods in Gaza, again under the pretext of self-defense against terrorists.

Perhaps it is finally time to ask what exactly constitutes terrorism.


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Philippine police say ICC suspension of war on drugs investigation will not stop local investigation https://iraqwarnews.net/philippine-police-say-icc-suspension-of-war-on-drugs-investigation-will-not-stop-local-investigation/ Wed, 24 Nov 2021 21:49:10 +0000 https://iraqwarnews.net/philippine-police-say-icc-suspension-of-war-on-drugs-investigation-will-not-stop-local-investigation/ BRUNSWICK, Georgia: Jurors on Wednesday convicted the three white men accused of the death of Ahmaud Arbery, the black man who was chased and shot as he ran through their neighborhood in an attack that was part of the most great national calculation on racial injustice.The jury deliberated for about 10 hours before sentencing Greg […]]]>

BRUNSWICK, Georgia: Jurors on Wednesday convicted the three white men accused of the death of Ahmaud Arbery, the black man who was chased and shot as he ran through their neighborhood in an attack that was part of the most great national calculation on racial injustice.
The jury deliberated for about 10 hours before sentencing Greg McMichael, his son Travis McMichael and neighbor William “Roddie” Bryan, all of whom face minimum life sentences. It is up to the judge to decide whether it comes with or without the possibility of parole.
Travis McMichael defended the verdict with his attorney’s arm around his shoulder. At one point, McMichael lowered his head to his chest. After the verdicts were read, as he got up to leave, he said “I love you” to his mother, who was in the courtroom.
Moments after the verdicts were announced, Arbery’s father Marcus Arbery Sr. was seen crying and hugging supporters outside the courtroom.
“He did nothing,” said the father, “but run and dream.”
Ben Crump, lawyer for Arbery’s father, spoke outside the courthouse, repeatedly saying: “The spirit of Ahmaud has defeated the mob of lynchings.
Arbery’s mother, Wanda Cooper-Jones, thanked the assembled crowd for the verdict and said she didn’t think she would see this day.
“It was a long fight. It was a tough fight. But God is good, ”she said. Of her son, she said, “He will now rest in peace.
The McMichaels seized guns and jumped into a van to chase the 25-year-old after seeing him running outside the port city of Brunswick, Georgia in February 2020. Bryan joined the chase in his pursuit. own van and recorded a cellphone video of Travis McMichael fatally shooting Arbery.
The father and son told police they suspected Arbery of being a runaway burglar. But the prosecution argued that the men caused the fatal confrontation and that there was no evidence Arbery committed any crimes in the neighborhood.
“We commend the courage and bravery of this jury to say that what happened on February 23, 2020 to Ahmaud Arbery – the hunt and murder of Ahmaud Arbery – was not only morally wrong but legally wrong, and we are grateful. “said Latonia Hines, assistant executive prosecutor for Cobb County.
Prosecutor Linda Dunikoski added, “The jury system works in this country, and when you present the truth to people and they see it, they will do the right thing. “
Bryan’s attorney, Kevin Gough, said his team were “disappointed with the verdict, but we respect it.” He was planning to file further legal claims for Bryan after the Thanksgiving vacation.
Superior Court judge Timothy Walmsley did not immediately set a sentencing date, saying he wanted to give both sides time to prepare.
Although prosecutors did not argue that racism motivated the murder, federal authorities charged them with hate crimes, alleging they hunted down and killed Arbery because he was black. This case is expected to be tried in February.
The disproportionately white jury received the case around noon Tuesday.
Shortly after returning to court on Wednesday morning, the jury sent a note to the judge asking him to view two versions of the filming video – the original and one that investigators improved to reduce shadows – three times each.
Jurors returned to the courtroom to view the videos and replay the 911 call one of the accused made from the bed of a van about 30 seconds before the shooting.
During the 911 call that the jury considered, Greg McMichael told an operator, “I’m here at Satilla Shores. There’s a black man running down the street.
He then begins to scream, apparently as Arbery runs towards McMichael’s idling truck with Bryan’s truck behind him, “Stop there!” Damn it, stop! Travis! Shots can be heard seconds later.
Graphic video of the death leaked online two months later, and the Georgia Bureau of Investigation took over the case, promptly arresting the three men. Each of them is charged with murder and other crimes.
Defense attorneys argue the McMichaels were attempting to arrest a legal citizen when they left after Arbery, seeking to arrest and question him as a suspected burglar after being seen fleeing a house under construction nearby.
Travis McMichael testified that he shot Arbery in self-defense, claiming the running man turned and attacked with his fists as he drove past the idling truck where Travis McMichael was standing with his shotgun.
Prosecutors said there was no evidence Arbery committed any crimes in the accused’s neighborhood. He had enrolled in a technical high school and was preparing to study to become an electrician like his uncles.
Shaun Seals, a 32-year-old longtime resident of Brunswick, rushed to the courthouse to join the crowd cheering for the verdict.
“We just went outside to witness the story,” Seals said, pushing his 10-month-old daughter in a stroller.
Seals, who is black, called the convictions a victory not just for his community but for the nation.
“It will not heal most of the wounds” of a long history of inequality, he said. “But it’s a start and it shows that people are trying. “


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Barbie “Maverick” doll hits shelves ahead of movie https://iraqwarnews.net/barbie-maverick-doll-hits-shelves-ahead-of-movie/ Mon, 22 Nov 2021 20:34:18 +0000 https://iraqwarnews.net/barbie-maverick-doll-hits-shelves-ahead-of-movie/ The long awaited Top Gun The sequel’s premiere may have been postponed until 2022, but on November 10, Mattel introduced the world to one of its main ladies, Natasha “Phoenix” Trace, as a collectible Barbie doll. If you want to buy one, however, the need for speed is critical. In less than two weeks, the […]]]>

The long awaited Top Gun The sequel’s premiere may have been postponed until 2022, but on November 10, Mattel introduced the world to one of its main ladies, Natasha “Phoenix” Trace, as a collectible Barbie doll.

If you want to buy one, however, the need for speed is critical.

In less than two weeks, the company sold all of its inventory of badass Barbie, although Target, Walmart, and Amazon appear to have a few more.

A limited edition, Phoenix is ​​described as “an extremely confident and capable pilot at the fiercely competitive Top Gun flight school”.

While Phoenix’s role in Top Gun: Maverick is unclear, we do know that she is played by actor Monica Barbaro from the TV series. The good cop and Unreal.

“Smart and talented, Phoenix commands the respect of fellow pilots while overcoming barriers in and out of the sky,” according to Mattel.

The doll is fitted with aviator glasses made famous by the original Top Gun, of course. She also wears a classic green flight suit, name tags and a helmet reminiscent of Maverick’s (Tom Cruise) from 1989.

Top Gun: Maverick is set to hit theaters on May 27, 2022.

Observation Post is the Military Times’ one stop shop for anything going on outside of business hours. Stories may reflect the author’s observations.

Sarah Sicard is editor-in-chief at the Military Times. Previously, she was digital editor of the Military Times and editor of the Army Times. Other work can be found in National Defense Magazine, Task & Purpose, and Defense News.


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Inspector General report whitewashes role of top Pentagon leaders in Trump January 6 coup https://iraqwarnews.net/inspector-general-report-whitewashes-role-of-top-pentagon-leaders-in-trump-january-6-coup/ Sat, 20 Nov 2021 05:50:55 +0000 https://iraqwarnews.net/inspector-general-report-whitewashes-role-of-top-pentagon-leaders-in-trump-january-6-coup/ Department of Defense (DoD) Acting Inspector General Sean O’Donnell released a report on the Pentagon’s response before and during the Jan.6 attack on the United States Capitol. The report completely whitewashes the role of senior Pentagon leaders before and during the attack on Congress by Trump supporters, including the central role of civilians and senior […]]]>

Department of Defense (DoD) Acting Inspector General Sean O’Donnell released a report on the Pentagon’s response before and during the Jan.6 attack on the United States Capitol. The report completely whitewashes the role of senior Pentagon leaders before and during the attack on Congress by Trump supporters, including the central role of civilians and senior Pentagon military officials in delaying the dispatch of troops from the Pentagon. the National Guard.

In this Jan. 6, 2021 photo, insurgents loyal to former President Donald Trump gather at the U.S. Capitol in Washington [Credit: AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana, File]

Apologizing for the military’s lack of preparedness before Jan. 6, O’Donnell, a Trump-appointed person who is also Inspector General of the Environmental Protection Agency, wrote: “We looked for a role or a responsibility for the DoD is taking preventative action to prevent or deter what later happened on Capitol Hill. We did not find any.

Seeking to discredit one of the few military officials who spoke out against the Pentagon’s actions on January 6, the report cites statements from anonymous witnesses to question Congressional testimony presented earlier this year by the former commander of the DC National Guard and current Sergeant-at-Arms William Marcheur.

Last March, Walker, speaking at a joint Senate Rules and Homeland Security Committee hearing, said Acting Defense Secretary Christopher Miller and Secretary of the Army Ryan McCarthy have delayed urgent requests of National Guard support on Capitol Hill for three hours and 19 minutes, leaving him “stunned and frustrated.” Walker said in March he had a 40-person rapid reaction force, waiting to be deployed to Capitol Hill in “20 minutes,” which “could have made a difference.”

Miller was appointed acting defense secretary on Nov. 9 following Trump’s election defeat. A 30-year veteran of the Army Special Forces who fought in both the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, Miller brought with him to the Pentagon Ezra Cohen-Watnick, a far-right operative with previous ties to the fascist Steve Bannon, and Kash Patel, a White House Assistant with an ultra-right background.

Interviewed for the IG report, Walker reiterated his testimony from March, including that his phone request at 1:49 p.m., at the request of U.S. Capitol Police Chief Steve Sund, for permission to deploying soldiers to the Capitol was delayed by the lieutenant. General Walter Piatt and Lieutenant General Charles Flynn, who advised McCarthy against sending troops to Capitol Hill. Walker said the two generals had expressed concerns to him and McCarthy about the soldiers’ “outlook” on Capitol Hill and that their presence could “stir up the crowd.”

The delay was caused in part because McCarthy, as the report confirms, repeatedly asked Walker for a “concept of operation.” As lawmakers ran for their lives and a functioning gallows erected outside the Capitol, McCarthy demanded detailed instructions on exactly what Walker’s troops would do, where they would go, to whom they would report and what would be. their exact mission before he brings Walker’s Request to Miller. Unlike US states, where governors command the National Guard, the DC National Guard operates under the direction of the Pentagon.


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Veterans for Peace commemorates Armistice Day in St. Pete https://iraqwarnews.net/veterans-for-peace-commemorates-armistice-day-in-st-pete/ Thu, 11 Nov 2021 21:47:00 +0000 https://iraqwarnews.net/veterans-for-peace-commemorates-armistice-day-in-st-pete/ PINELLAS COUNTY, Florida – As the nation celebrated Veterans Day Thursday, a small group of veterans and their supporters gathered Thursday at Williams Park in St. Petersburg to celebrate Armistice Day, a day which, according to them, is to celebrate peace, not militarism. What would you like to know Veterans Day has only been a […]]]>

PINELLAS COUNTY, Florida – As the nation celebrated Veterans Day Thursday, a small group of veterans and their supporters gathered Thursday at Williams Park in St. Petersburg to celebrate Armistice Day, a day which, according to them, is to celebrate peace, not militarism.


What would you like to know

  • Veterans Day has only been a public holiday in the United States since 1954. Between 1938 and 1953, it was called Armistice Day.
  • Veterans make up about 7.9% of the U.S. population, but account for about 13.5% of suicides in the country, according to the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention.
  • Veterans for Peace has more than 150 chapters across the country.

November 11 marked the end of hostilities in World War I in 1918 and was named Armistice Day the following year by US President Woodrow Wilson. In making his proclamation, Wilson said: “For us in America, the reflections on Armistice Day will be filled with solemn pride for the heroism of those who have died in the service of the country and gratitude for the victory, at the both because of the thing he set us free and because of the opportunity it gave America to show sympathy for peace and justice in the councils of nations.

Armistice Day then became a federal holiday in 1938 and was changed to Veterans Day in 1954.

“I think a veteran like us, and this veteran here, we want peace. We’ve seen war and we don’t want to see how ugly it is, ”said Jay Alexander, acting president of the Tampa Bay Chapter of Veterans for Peace, who stood right next to Mike Flannery, a Navy veteran who served in Vietnam.

Alexander wore a shirt with a quote from former President Dwight Eisenhower on the back. Eisenhower served as the Supreme Allied Commander in Europe in 1943. His quote from 1946 read: “I hate war as only a soldier who has lived it can do it, only as someone who has seen its brutality. , its futility, its stupidity.

It was the first Veterans Day / Armistice Day celebration in over 20 years that the United States had no military troops in Afghanistan. The United States completed its withdrawal in late August, but not before a chaotic exit that included a terrorist attack that killed 13 US Marines.

The precipitous ending has brought unfavorable comparisons to how the country left Vietnam in 1975, putting a dark coda on America’s longest war.

“Nation building is not our strong suit,” said Orlando Acosta, a US Air Force veteran and former St. Petersburg city council candidate who served in Afghanistan and was in attendance Thursday. “The others are much better than us. Building a nation from the embers that were Afghanistan afterwards is a multigenerational task. “

One of the issues championed by Veterans for Peace is the repeal of the 2002 Use of Military Force Authorization (AUMF) which gave President George W. Bush the power to invade Iraq in early 2003.

“Congress has a duty to declare war, not the president,” says Alexander.

A major problem for the military community over the past decade and more has been the high rate of suicide among veterans. Veterans make up about 7.9% of the U.S. population, but account for about 13.5% of suicides in the country, according to the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention.

The Biden administration last week announced a series of five goals and executive orders that they believe will advance suicide prevention efforts. “Suicide among military personnel, veterans and their families is a public health and national security crisis,” the White House said.

Veterans for Peace have not always been welcome in some Veterans and Memorial Day parades across the country. Alexander said this had not been the case in Pinellas County, saying he and other members marched at an event in Gulfport honoring the veterans a few years ago.

“There are cities that are not yet ‘awakened’. They are still in the past, ”he said. “It’s time to bring peace and show that we are veterans and we have seen it firsthand. We were involved in it and we were under fire.

Abimael Jimenez, assistant to Congressman Charlie Crist, also attended the debates. Jimenez read aloud a statement from Crist.

“I am commenting on Chapter 119 of Veterans for Peace for their dedication to commemorating the two veterans in distress of peace,” the congressman wrote.


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Max Cleland dies; a senator and a veteran lost limbs in Vietnam https://iraqwarnews.net/max-cleland-dies-a-senator-and-a-veteran-lost-limbs-in-vietnam/ Wed, 10 Nov 2021 00:23:00 +0000 https://iraqwarnews.net/max-cleland-dies-a-senator-and-a-veteran-lost-limbs-in-vietnam/ Posted on Tuesday, November 9, 2021 | 4:23 p.m. Updated 5 hours and 41 minutes ago ATLANTA (AP) – Max Cleland, who lost three limbs to a hand grenade in Vietnam and later became a revolutionary leader of the Veterans Administration and United States Senator from Georgia until a attack involving his patriotism derailed his […]]]>

Updated 5 hours and 41 minutes ago

ATLANTA (AP) – Max Cleland, who lost three limbs to a hand grenade in Vietnam and later became a revolutionary leader of the Veterans Administration and United States Senator from Georgia until a attack involving his patriotism derailed his re-election, died Tuesday. He was 79 years old.

Cleland died at his Atlanta home from congestive heart failure, his personal assistant Linda Dean told The Associated Press.

Cleland was a U.S. Army captain in Vietnam when he lost his right arm and both legs while picking up a dropped grenade in 1968. He blamed himself for decades, until he learned that another soldier had let go. He also spent many months in ill-equipped hospitals to help so many wounded soldiers.

Other veterans cheered when President Jimmy Carter appointed Cleland as head of the Veterans Administration, a position he held from 1977 to 1981. true condition while Cleland was in charge, and he s ‘is striving to provide better care for veterans and their families.

Cleland’s defeat in the Senate in 2002 sparked lingering controversy after Saxby Chambliss’ campaign ran an advertisement that showed images of Osama bin Laden and Saddam Hussein and questioned the Democrat’s commitment to standing up for the nation. . Senator John McCain was among those who condemned his Republican colleague’s decision.

President Joe Biden on Tuesday hailed his Senate colleague as someone with “unwavering patriotism, boundless courage and a rare character.”

“His leadership was the essential driving force behind the creation of the modern VA healthcare system, where so many of his fellow heroes have found vital support and renewed purpose thanks in large part to Max’s lasting impact,” Biden said. in a statement.

President Bill Clinton hailed Cleland as an extraordinary public servant, saying, “I will forever be inspired by the strength he has shown in supporting normalization with Vietnam after making deep personal sacrifices during the war.

A native of the Atlanta suburb of Lithonia, Cleland was seriously injured on April 8, 1968, near Khe Sanh, as he grabbed the grenade he thought fell from his belt when jumping from a helicopter.

“When my eyes cleared, I looked at my right hand. It was gone. Nothing but a shattered white bone protruded from my shredded elbow, ”Cleland wrote in his 1980 memoir,“ Strong at the Broken Places ”.

After his comrades made a frantic effort to stop his bleeding and he was flown back by helicopter to a field hospital, Cleland wrote that he begged a doctor to save one of his legs, but he didn’t. was not left enough.

“What put salt in my wounds was the possibility of knowing that it could be my grenade,” he said in a 1999 interview.

But later that year, former Marine Cpl. David Lloyd, who said he was one of the first to reach Cleland after the explosion, came forward to say he treated another soldier at the scene who was sobbing uncontrollably and said: ” It was my grenade, it was my grenade. ”

Cleland was an accomplished varsity swimmer and basketball player, measuring 6ft 2in and developing an interest in politics. Back home with a triple amputee, Cleland remembers being depressed and worried about his future, but still interested in running for office.

“I sat in my mom and dad’s living room and took stock of my life,” Cleland said in an interview in 2002. “No job. No hope of a job. No job offer. job. No girlfriend. No apartment. No car. And I said, ‘This is a great time to run for the State Senate.’

Cleland won a seat in the state Senate, then waged a failed 1974 campaign for lieutenant governor before Carter appointed his compatriot Georgian as head of the VA. Carter on Tuesday called Cleland “a true American hero who was no stranger to sacrifice.”

“We are grateful for his commitment to the citizens of the United States, but also for the personal role he has played in our lives,” Carter said on behalf of himself and his wife Rosalynn.

Cleland left Washington after Carter lost his re-election and in 1982 was elected Georgia’s secretary of state, a post he held for a dozen years. Then he won the Senate seat from Sam Nunn, who is retiring, but only held it for one term. Polls have shown he led his re-election efforts before Chambliss’ devastating publicity.

“Accusing me of being gentle on homeland defense and Osama bin Laden is the most vicious exploitation of a national tragedy and assassination attempt I have ever witnessed,” Cleland said at the time.

Cleland wrote in his second memoir, “Heart of a Patriot,” that he lost his fiancee, his income and his sense of purpose when he left the Senate. He ended up at Walter Reed Army Medical Center, where he himself was diagnosed with PTSD, decades after the explosion.

“I was totally hurt and devastated – desperate and overwhelmed,” Cleland wrote. “Just as I had been that day in April 1968 when the grenade tore off my legs and right arm. Emotionally, spiritually, physically and mentally, I was bleeding and dying. “

Cleland recovered and was director of the Export-Import Bank; later, President Barack Obama appointed him secretary of the American Battle Monuments Commission.

John Kerry, a Democratic senator and later his party’s presidential candidate in 2004, said he and other Vietnam veterans share a special bond with Cleland.

“One of the greatest gifts we ever received was a voice on the other end of the phone, with a sixth sense to call when you needed to hear it most, saying ‘Hey brother, this is Max. ‘ For those of us who knew and loved him, Max Cleland will always be our brother, ”Kerry said in a statement.

As a senator, Cleland voted to allow President George W. Bush’s plan to go to war in Iraq, but later said he regretted it, becoming a fierce critic of Bush’s Iraq policies and comparing America’s involvement in the Vietnam War.

“He never asked me to do anything that wasn’t quite right,” H. Wayne Howell, Cleland’s longtime assistant secretary of state and chief of cabinet in the Senate.

In concluding his early memoirs, Cleland explained the title of this book, saying that through crises and defeats, “I have learned that it is possible to become strong in broken places.


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Plan to recruit women unites unlikely political allies https://iraqwarnews.net/plan-to-recruit-women-unites-unlikely-political-allies/ Fri, 05 Nov 2021 17:54:05 +0000 https://iraqwarnews.net/plan-to-recruit-women-unites-unlikely-political-allies/ The Chinese hawk, Senator Josh Hawley, normally has little in common with the anti-war group Code Pink. But the two are on the same side when it comes to keeping women out of the draft. Congress is expected to debate this year whether women should register with the Selective Service, when it reviews the 2022 […]]]>

The Chinese hawk, Senator Josh Hawley, normally has little in common with the anti-war group Code Pink. But the two are on the same side when it comes to keeping women out of the draft.

Congress is expected to debate this year whether women should register with the Selective Service, when it reviews the 2022 National Defense Authorization Tax Law. The fight unites advocates at opposite ends of the political spectrum, even though their reasons for supporting or opposing change are different.

“They’re a strange couple,” said Kara Vuic, an expert on women in the military who teaches at Texas Christian University. “They are united because they don’t want women to go to war, whether it’s because they don’t want anyone to go to war or because they think women should be at home… It brings together people for both pro and con who probably agree with each other on absolutely nothing else.

Objections are likely to fall flat. There is bipartisan support in the House and Senate for the proposal requiring women to register. The House has already approved the bill and the Senate Armed Forces Committee passed the law in committee with the support of Republicans.

“Joining it with the NDAA essentially ensures that it [pass], barring a massive Herculean effort to untie it somehow, ”Vuic said. “I think it will pass. It’s high time.

These Herculean efforts, however, are underway. Conservative media are pressuring officials on this issue. Code Pink is hosting webinars to lobby for the complete abolition of the project, arguing that it is not gender equality to force men and women into the military, said Carley Towne, co-director of the non-profit association.. And Hawley, R-Mo., Who led the Senate’s efforts to overturn the 2020 presidential election, introduced an amendment this week to fight the proposal on the Senate floor.

“It is wrong to force our daughters, mothers, wives and sisters to wage our wars,” Hawley said in a statement Monday. “Volunteering for military service is not the same as being forced into it, and no woman should be forced to do so. “

Despite this opposition, there are also GOP lawmakers who support it, including Representative Mike Waltz, R-Fla., A former Army Green Beret who sponsored the amendment to add this provision to the House with the representing Chrissy Houlahan, D-Penn.

“In fact, I see less conservative opposition than ever in the past,” said Amy Rutenberg, a professor at Iowa State University, adding that it is “absolutely the furthest” than the effort to compel women to register has been obtained at Capitol Hill.

Some non-traditional allies are joining forces to support change. The ACLU, which historically fights for women’s rights and against gender discrimination, worked with the National Coalition for Men, which fights to end discrimination and stereotypes against men, in a lawsuit, because both groups believe that a project that excludes women is discriminatory.

A legal effort in 1981 to force women to register failed when the Supreme Court ruled that it was constitutional to recruit only men because women at that time could not serve in combat. But several experts have said that a conscription reserved for men is now unconstitutional by that same logic, since the ban on women serving in combat was lifted in 2016, although women had served in war zones long before that. .

The ACLU’s most recent lawsuit went to the Supreme Court, which declined to consider the case in June because Congress is actively reviewing the proposal.

Congress seems poised to approve the change. The National Defense Authorization Tax Law 2022, which contains the provision, was passed by the House by a bipartisan vote of 316-113. The Senate as a whole has yet to consider the bill, but the Senate Armed Services Committee approved the bill by a 23-3 vote, showing strong support from Republicans.

“My point is that we now have a force that would not be as effective or efficient without women,” Sen. Jack Reed, DR.I. the Aspen Security Forum. “I don’t think most women think they shouldn’t register. I think they should.

President Joe Biden also supports women who sign up for selective service. During his presidential bid last September, he told the Military Officers Association of America that he would “ensure that women are equally eligible to enroll in the selective service system so that both men and women be treated on an equal footing in the event of future conflicts ”.

And military leaders are also supporting change. Joint Chiefs Chairman Gen. Mark Milley told the Aspen Security Forum that all women who can meet military service standards are welcome, although he added that no one was talking about bringing back the project, which was last used in 1972.

Congress last considered whether to force women to sign up for the project in 2016, as Rep. Duncan Hunter, R-Calif., Introduced an amendment to the annual Defense Policy Bill to stress that if members don’t support female editors, they shouldn’t support female combat troops either. To his surprise, the amendment was passed by the House, although it was withdrawn from the final bill. As a compromise, lawmakers instead ordered an independent commission to study the matter.

In March 2020, the commission released its report and recommended that men and women between the ages of 18 and 26 be required to register for selective service.

Women will have to register for the project within one year of the bill being passed, if the language remains in the legislation after negotiations. While the logistics of implementation should be easy – women will just check in the same way as men, which happens automatically in many states when obtaining a driver’s license – the public integration will take longer, said Rutenberg. She expects the government to need to launch an aggressive public relations campaign to raise awareness of the new law since, so far, the provision buried in the flawed defense authorization bill has failed. has not received much attention from the general public.

“I don’t think it’s been on the radar a lot,” she said. “Most people are totally oblivious.”

Public support for adding women to the project is declining. In 2016, when Congress last debated the issue, 63% of Americans supported drafting of both sexes. But an Ipsos poll in August found that number was only 45%. Support is even lower among women, of whom only about a third support change.

Just as the conflict looks drastically different today from what it was at the end of the Vietnam War, experts predict that the project would also be different if revived. For example, as cyber warfare becomes a greater threat, Vuic predicted that civilians with computer skills could be enlisted to aid the country, citing as an example an existing plan that could be activated to recruit civilian medical personnel in the event of a disaster. crisis.

Reed recognized that the evolution of conflict means that different people may be best suited for the mission.

“We’re going to need a lot more people who can drive autonomous vehicles. You don’t have to be 6ft 2in to do this, ”he said.

Even in this form, restarting the Selective Service process and adding conscripts to the volunteer-only force is highly unlikely and would require national emergency and Congressional action. But, Vuic said that regardless of whether women are actually recruited, adding women to the system is important for its symbolism alone.

“This is the last legal distinction between the obligations of men and women as citizens,” she said, adding that both sexes are expected to act the same in other ways, such as sitting in juries or pay taxes. “On paper, men and women will be completely equal.”


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Yemen’s other war in Saudi Arabia https://iraqwarnews.net/yemens-other-war-in-saudi-arabia/ Wed, 03 Nov 2021 04:29:47 +0000 https://iraqwarnews.net/yemens-other-war-in-saudi-arabia/ The war in Yemen left a quarter of a million people dead and billions of dollars in economic damage, leading some to dub it the world’s worst man-made humanitarian crisis. A vicious cycle of Saudi airstrikes and Houthi military offensives, coupled with a Saudi-led blockade and Houthi interference in the delivery of humanitarian aid, has […]]]>

The war in Yemen left a quarter of a million people dead and billions of dollars in economic damage, leading some to dub it the world’s worst man-made humanitarian crisis. A vicious cycle of Saudi airstrikes and Houthi military offensives, coupled with a Saudi-led blockade and Houthi interference in the delivery of humanitarian aid, has exposed more than half of Yemen’s population to the famine and generalized communicable diseases. The conflict between a Saudi-led coalition and Iran-backed Houthi rebels, which began in 2015, is just the most recent episode in a long history of Saudi attempts to control and subdue Yemen’s economy and political establishment. For more than three decades, Saudi Arabia has waged an economic campaign to suppress its southern neighbor in order to prevent it from becoming a regional competitor. More recently, Saudi Arabia began canceling work visas for tens of thousands of Yemeni migrant workers, forcing them to return to a war-torn country amid an ongoing humanitarian crisis.

Saudi Arabia’s decision to expel Yemeni workers, while particularly heinous given the circumstances of their displacement, is part of a long-standing pattern. Since the establishment of the modern Saudi state in the 1930s, successive monarchs have feared the threat that a united, prosperous and democratic Yemen could pose to their rule, especially after the unification of North and South Yemen. in 1990. The Saudis found ways to foment internal divisions and weaken the Yemeni economy, including withdrawing work permits from guests and canceling foreign aid, on which the country depends. The Saudi decision to exclude Yemen from the oil-rich Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) – a regional political and economic union – has also exacerbated Yemen’s economic collapse, adding to the political turmoil and governance crisis that have divided the country and led to civil war.

While it may seem premature to consider Yemen’s post-conflict future given the ongoing hostilities, it is arguably in Saudi Arabia’s interest not only to end its military incursion, but also to help consolidate its neighbor politically and economically. Decades of efforts to hamper Yemen’s development have failed to meet Saudi security goals of cultivating a weak and malleable Yemeni state. On the contrary, they only succeeded in generating a costly and volatile military conflict. The kingdom would do well to integrate Yemen into the regional economy and create legal avenues for its citizens to work in Saudi Arabia again.

A long, intertwined story

Prior to 1990, the migration of Yemeni workers to Saudi Arabia and other Gulf countries led to an economic boom in their country, with these migrant workers sending remittances that funded local construction and development projects in the north. and southern Yemen. Northern Yemenis particularly benefited, as Saudi Arabia granted them privileged status, waiving the documents and sponsorship required of other migrant workers and allowing them relatively free passage to and from Saudi oil fields and construction sites. . Throughout the 1970s and 1980s, approximately 700,000 to 1.8 million Yemenis worked in GCC countries, which include the oil-rich Arab monarchies of Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates.

Almost all Yemeni households have benefited either directly from workers’ remittances or indirectly from the impact of the influx of money on local purchasing power and small-scale investment projects. Friends and families of migrant workers formed local development associations, grassroots organizations that pooled remittances and invested in rural development projects. The LDAs were notable not only for their ability to spur targeted development, but also for their ability to empower local leaders while insulating themselves from the whims of a largely corrupt Yemeni central government.

For more than three decades, Saudi Arabia has waged an economic campaign to suppress its neighbor to the south.

By the end of the 1980s, however, Saudi employers longed for a cheaper and more flexible source of labor and began to seek an alternative labor pool to replace the Yemeni labor force. . In its place, migrant workers from South and Southeast Asia became the fastest growing workforce in Saudi Arabia, in part because Saudi leaders considered them less likely to engage. in Arab or Islamist nationalist agitation.

Saudis’ fears about the example Yemen could set for the region peaked with the country’s unification in 1990, creating a multi-party democracy in a region ruled by family autocracies. In particular, the Saudis feared that its neighbor to the south would become a safe haven for opposition groups. To prevent this possibility, the Saudis sought to weaken the fledgling Yemeni state by helping it economically. And the Yemeni government, in an unfortunate misstep, aided this campaign after Iraqi President Saddam Hussein invaded Kuwait.

Nowhere to turn

At the time, Yemen was on the UN Security Council, and its delegate voted against authorizing the use of force “by any means necessary” to liberate Kuwait from Iraqi occupation in November. 1990. This tacit support for Saddam’s regime emanated from Yemen’s long history of economic and military cooperation with Iraq – a relationship that was formalized in 1989 with the creation of the Arab Cooperation Council (ACC), an alliance of Egypt, Iraq, Jordan and Yemen and which presented itself as a regional alternative to the elitist GCC.

Yemen’s vote was, as US Secretary of State James Baker noted, one of the country’s costliest mistakes. The United States, the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund immediately halted aid programs in Yemen. Among the Gulf states, Saudi Arabia and other neighbors have revoked the special status granted to Yemeni migrant workers, effectively deporting 880,000 Yemeni workers. Although the expulsion was touted as a reaction to Yemen’s pro-Saddam stance, it was also the culmination of Saudi Arabia’s gradual transition away from a Yemeni workforce. The expelled migrants returned home with an estimated unemployment rate of 30 to 40 percent, without any alternative vocational training and without adequate housing, which resulted in a crisis of man-made refugees.

Yemen must be integrated into the economic fold.

The loss of remittances threatened the disintegration of the Yemeni economy. Fortunately, the discovery of oil in Yemen in the late 1980s and its development during the 1990s introduced a new source of revenue for the Yemeni state. The public treasury’s transition from workers’ remittances to oil revenues, however, has exacerbated existing socio-economic divisions and deepened deep inequalities. Yemen’s larger workforce has remained underutilized, disenfranchised and impoverished while a small segment of Yemen’s political elite profited from the windfall in oil revenues. In addition, rampant corruption and economic mismanagement meant that the already scarce public funds the government was distributing for social and economic development were often used for political patronage rather than for investment in infrastructure.

Economic desperation and a relatively porous 800-mile border with Saudi Arabia have led to large numbers of undocumented Yemeni workers flocking to the kingdom. Saudi officials largely turned a blind eye to migrant workers, who held jobs Saudi citizens did not want, but periodic Saudi crackdowns on illegal workers invariably targeted Yemenis. In 2013, for example, nearly 400,000 Yemenis were expelled in accordance with the kingdom’s new economic policies. Despite this massive deportation, years of gradual economic reconciliation and migrant flows had led around two million Yemenis to work in Saudi Arabia before the latest deportation order. Remittances from these workers amounted to $ 2.3 billion per year, accounting for 61% of Yemen’s total remittances sent from abroad. For a country with an estimated annual GDP of $ 20 billion, these funds play a disproportionate role, and losing this influx of money would be devastating for a country already in economic and political free fall. The ongoing Saudi-led blockade and the internal political and social repression of the Houthis have left the Yemeni people with few other options for regular employment.

A solid foundation

Yemen must be integrated into the economic fold, and the process must begin even before a full ceasefire is negotiated and peaceful reconciliation takes place. Economic reconstruction funds could build on Yemen’s local development legacy, funding the same local development associations and other local organizations that emerged during the oil boom era of the 1970s and 1980s.

Yemen’s post-war economic recovery would benefit from the country’s formal membership in the GCC alliance. This would improve the labor crisis in Yemen by formalizing the work authorization process for migrant workers. With an unemployment rate of over 13% nationwide and over 25% for 15-24 year olds, Yemen faces an economic crisis that will persist well beyond the current conflict if immediate action is not taken. are not taken to consolidate its economy and its labor market. Reliable employment opportunities throughout the Persian Gulf region would pave the way for prosperity for Yemeni youth who might otherwise turn to extremist organizations for social assistance and financial support. This economic desperation is in part responsible for the Houthi movement, which emerged from a cloud of political and economic grievances motivated by unequal investments in infrastructure and widespread unemployment. Yemen’s future institutions will not survive – at least not without costly political or military intervention – if the country’s basic socio-economic problems are not addressed from the start.

Although Saudi Arabia has opposed Yemen’s previous efforts to join the GCC, the reality of the current conflict may have changed regional calculations. The security of the southern border with Yemen continues to be one of Saudi Arabia’s main concerns and was one of the main reasons for embarking on the ill-fated military campaign in 2015. Despite spending $ 100 billion dollars for the war in Yemen, the southern border is far more dangerous than six years ago. Shifting to a strategy that instead supports Yemen’s economic development in the short and long term could potentially foster this elusive stability, without giving rise to further bloodshed and humanitarian crises.

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Sight Magazine – Essay: What 20 years (and more) of the war on terror must teach us https://iraqwarnews.net/sight-magazine-essay-what-20-years-and-more-of-the-war-on-terror-must-teach-us/ Tue, 02 Nov 2021 00:15:27 +0000 https://iraqwarnews.net/sight-magazine-essay-what-20-years-and-more-of-the-war-on-terror-must-teach-us/ November 02, 2021 DIANE RANDALL RNS Late on October 7, 2001, less than a month after the September 11 attacks, American fighter jets swept the Afghan skies. This moment marked the beginning of the war in Afghanistan, and more broadly, the beginning of our “war on terrorism”. When the fighting began, peace advocates across the […]]]>

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Late on October 7, 2001, less than a month after the September 11 attacks, American fighter jets swept the Afghan skies. This moment marked the beginning of the war in Afghanistan, and more broadly, the beginning of our “war on terrorism”.

When the fighting began, peace advocates across the world knew what to expect. As with any war, there would be needless deaths, horrific destruction and terrible tragedies.

An Apache helicopter provides protection from the air as paratroopers take position shortly after the air assault in Lwar Kowndalan, Afghanistan, October 1, 2005. Photo: US Army photo by Spc Mike Pryor / Wikipedia / Creative Commons.

But few of us could have known the full extent of what was to come. Over the next 20 years, the United States engaged in what would become the longest war in our history – longer than the Civil War, World War I, and World War II combined. The global war on terrorism has involved dozens of other nations, and in the wars that followed September 11, more than 929,000 people died and 38 million people were forced to flee their homes – all in more than more than 8 trillion dollars taxpayer price.

Twenty years later, with US ground troops freshly withdrawing from Afghanistan, now is the perfect time to reflect on what the past two decades of violence have brought about. Given the experience in Afghanistan, it is clearer than ever that the global war on terrorism has been an outright humanitarian and strategic disaster. It is now the duty of our legislators to ensure that we learn to prevent and end wars.

“Twenty years later, with US ground troops newly withdrawn from Afghanistan, now is the perfect time to reflect on what the past two decades of violence have brought about. Given the experience in Afghanistan, it is clearer than ever that the global war on terrorism has been a merciless war. humanitarian and strategic disaster. It is now the duty of our legislators to ensure that we learn to prevent and end wars.

The war hurts us all

As Quakers, we are guided by our faith to pursue a world free from war and the threat of war. This belief is rooted in the obvious fact that war causes unnecessary death and destruction. In the case of the war on terror, this suffering fell largely on the shoulders of the people of Afghanistan, Iraq and other Asian and African countries.

But the endless wars have also caused considerable damage here at home. As the government poured trillions of dollars into the war machine, many other pressing issues remained unanswered. The climate crisis worsened, income inequalities soared, poverty and hunger continued at unacceptable rates.

Meanwhile, our annual military budget has climbed to over $ 750 billion this year. Even if this figure remains stable over the next decade (which is rarely the case), we will spend more than twice as much on the military as it would cost to fund the 10-year Build Back Better takeover proposed by the ‘Biden administration. And that was before the US $ 3.5 trillion recovery program started to be cut dramatically.

These costs of war are not as visible, but their impact runs deep – not just for us, but for generations to come.

Terrorism cannot be defeated by war and violence.



The war on terrorism was based on the mistaken premise that terrorism can be defeated militarily. This has been proven wrong. In fact, since September 11, 2001, the number of terrorist acts worldwide has quintupled per year.

Rather than making us safer, the militarized approach to terrorism has opened a never-ending cycle of retaliation and trauma, in which terrorist groups use attacks as a recruiting ground.

Instead of trying to resolve violence with violence, the United States should invest in peacebuilding strategies that address the underlying drivers of terrorism. This includes engaging in multilateral diplomacy, expanding economic opportunities, and empowering local solutions. While these are long-term efforts, they are much cheaper and more sustainable than our current approach.

Sight Subscriber Announcement Oct. 21, 2

Congress must seize its constitutional authority over the war.

Shortly after the September 11 attacks, Congress passed two authorizations – known as the 2001 and 2002 authorizations for the use of military force, or AUMF – which gave the president broad authority to make war across the world. Thanks to these AUMFs, the war on terror has grown in importance with little congressional oversight.

When it comes to public policy, we believe Congress should exercise its constitutional powers of debate and vote before the President commits our nation to war. Lawmakers have abdicated this responsibility for far too long, and the results have been disastrous for all of us.

After two decades of perpetual warfare, the war-first paradigm runs deep in our government. Uprooting him will not be easy. But frankly, we have little choice. If we truly want our country to be a leader of peace, we must invest in peaceful ways to prevent wars and tackle the underlying damage that leads people to violence.

We can learn the lessons of 20 years of war to prevent future wars.

Diane Randall

Diane Randall is the general secretary of the Committee of Friends on National Law, a national, non-partisan Quaker lobby for peace, justice and the environment.


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Senator Josh Hawley pledges to fight plan to force women into military service https://iraqwarnews.net/senator-josh-hawley-pledges-to-fight-plan-to-force-women-into-military-service/ Mon, 01 Nov 2021 17:47:47 +0000 https://iraqwarnews.net/senator-josh-hawley-pledges-to-fight-plan-to-force-women-into-military-service/ A key Republican senator on Monday said he was stepping up his campaign to block a sweeping overhaul of military bills that would force first-time women to sign up for the military project. Senator Josh Hawley of Missouri said Monday he was introducing an amendment to the National Defense Authorization Act of 2022 that would […]]]>

A key Republican senator on Monday said he was stepping up his campaign to block a sweeping overhaul of military bills that would force first-time women to sign up for the military project.

Senator Josh Hawley of Missouri said Monday he was introducing an amendment to the National Defense Authorization Act of 2022 that would remove the requirement for women to register with the Selective Service System, now hidden in the massive annual bill from the Pentagon.

“It is wrong to force our daughters, mothers, wives and sisters to wage our wars,” Mr Hawley said in a statement.

The issue proved more politically divisive for Republicans than for Democrats on the Hill, who mostly supported change. The Armed Services House and Senate panels in 2016 also approved extending the registration requirement to women, but the provision did not survive in the final bill, which is traditionally one of the most bipartisan actions taken by Congress each year.

Democratic Rep. Chrissy Houlahan of Pennsylvania and her veteran Republican colleague Michael Waltz of Florida co-sponsored the amendment earlier this year during the House Bill committee’s markup.

But in July, Mr Hawley joined four Republican colleagues on the Senate Armed Services Committee to vote against requiring women to register. He recognized that women have played a vital role in the defense of America throughout the country’s history.

“Our country is extremely grateful to the courageous women who have volunteered to serve our country with and alongside our fighting forces,” he said. “But volunteering for military service is not the same as being forced into it, and no woman should be forced to do so.”

Oklahoma Senator James M. Inhofe, the former chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee and now its leading Republican member, joined Mr. Hawley in opposing the provision. Mr Inhofe is scheduled for a press briefing on Tuesday to discuss what he said are issues delaying adoption of this year’s NDAA.

Requiring women to register for conscription, however, enjoys bipartisan support, with supporters saying the time is right because all military jobs have been opened to them. According to the Pentagon, about one in seven members of the entire U.S. military force is female, and the Department of Defense lifted the ban on women occupying ground combat positions in December 2015.

U.S. military conscription was abolished in 1973, but American males must still register with the government when they turn 18 if conscription is reintroduced.

“I hope we will still have an all-volunteer force. However, I think women should enroll in selective service like their male counterparts, ”said Sen. Joni Ernst, a Republican from Iowa who led army troops in Kuwait and Iraq before taking over. his retirement as a lieutenant colonel, at the Des Moines Register in 2016.

Lawmakers are acting on a March 2020 report by the National Commission on Military, National and Public Service established by Congress, which recommended that women be required to register and be eligible if the project is restored.

The 11-member panel “seriously examined a wide range of deeply felt moral, legal and practical arguments and explored the available empirical evidence,” the commission said in its final report.

“The commission concluded that the time has come to expand enrollment in the selective service system to include men and women, aged 18 to 26. This is a necessary and fair step in harnessing the talent of a unified nation in a time of national emergency.

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